25
May

Time To Address Time Again

Right after I started with this blog I posted about 'time' which isn't linear nor cyclical or modular because those qualities presume that time is something measurable which it isn't and thus 'time' simply defies our conventions. I still think so but meanwhile I have given the phenomenon we call time some more thought and want to share.
Lets first look at the commonly accepted definition of time:
time
tʌɪm/
noun
  1. the INDEFINITE continued progress of existence and EVENTS in the past, present, and future regarded as a whole.
Notice how event is part of the definition. What EVENT? YOUR LIFE! So time is an event that you 'create' and many yous do the same, meaning countless events happening in....ONE SPACE, AN ABSOLUTE. And what about INDEFINITE? This means unknown and vague and therefore 'impure' and not an ABSOLUTE, finite and pure. Think: at least binary....good/evil....get it?
Today this sentence came my way and it relates to the topic of time:
“Love and time; those are the only two things in all the world and all of life that cannot be bought, but only spent.”
- Gary Jennings
First it is obvious that the latter part of the sentence it is rooted in 'the world' (as in: ephemeral, trivial and profane) given the man made constructed ways of buying and spending, a system which wasn't always t here. Love and time on the other hand go way back before 'the world' came into being, think the biblical garden of Eden before the fall of man. So we're looking at a metaphor translated in such a way that the conditioned contemporary money obsessed mind can hopefully grasp something profound and meaningful.
Noteworthy also is the syntax; love is mentioned before time which is correct if you ask me. Why? Simple: love, just like space is an absolute as opposed to created events, time, which are 'sometimes propositions'.
So now go figure why the following dialogue from the movie 'The Man From Earth' bears more significance than the agreed purpose of an average movie would suggest:
Dan: Time... you can't see it, you can hear it, you can't weigh it, you can't... measure it in a laboratory. It is a subjective sense of... becoming, what we... are, in stead of what we were a nanosecond ago, becoming what we will be in another nanosecond. The whole piece of time's a landscape existing, we form behind us and we move, we move through it... slice by slice.
Linda Murphy: Clocks measure time.
Dan: NO, THEY MEASURE THEMSELVES, THE OBJECTIVE REFEREE OF A CLOCK IS ANOTHER CLOCK.

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